Kaisa_2012_3_photo by Veikko Somerpuro

Enrol
29.8.2019 at 15:05 - 9.10.2019 at 16:00

Timetable

Here is the course’s teaching schedule. Check the description for possible other schedules.

DateTimeLocation
Wed 23.10.2019
09:00 - 12:00
Tue 5.11.2019
09:00 - 16:00
Tue 12.11.2019
09:00 - 16:00

Description

Doctoral students enrolled in CVM doctoral programme. CVM degree programme is responsible for the course. This course belongs to Scientific education module.

Enrolment in the CVM doctoral programme, otherwise no prerequisites.

At the completion of the course, a student

1) understands basic concepts in epidemiology, including measures of disease frequency and measures of association, study designs, diagnostic test characteristics and bias.

2) understands the basis for sample size calculations.

3) is aware of Strobe-Vet and Reflect statements and able to apply them for reporting his/her own study results.

Any time, but preferably in early stages of graduate work.

Course will be offered as needed.

Course will cover the following topics:

Introduction to epi: models of causation, population hierarchy, measures of disease frequency, measures of association, diagnostic tests, study designs, bias
Sampling and sample size calculations
STROBE-Vet, REFLECT statements
Precourse assignments

1) For day 1:
* Read chapters 1 and 2 in Dirk Pfeiffer: Introduction to veterinary epidemiology
Prepare for a quiz in the first day

2) For day 2:
* Read chapters 4, 5, 7 and 8 from in Dirk Pfeiffer: Introduction to veterinary epidemiology
* Write a one-page executive summary for one of your subprojects. Include 3 keywords describing your project. Instructions are given in 1st day

3) For day 3
* Read chapter 6 from Pfeiffer
* Read pages 208-232 (Validity in observational studies) from Ian Dohoo et al’s Veterinary epidemiologic research
* Write justification for your sample size calculation
* Comment two of your fellow students’ executive summaries and respond to the comments you received.

During the workshop:

* Attend the lectures and actively participate in the exercises & discussions in class

Pfeiffer D: Introduction to veterinary epidemiology
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/305279557_Introduction_to_Veterinary_Epidemiology

Dohoo I, Martin W, Stryhn H: Veterinary Epidemiologic Research, The University of Prince Edward Island, 2nd ed, Ver Inc, Charlotteville, 2009.

O'Connor, A. M., J. M. Sargeant, I. R. Dohoo, H. N. Erb, M. Cevallos, M. Egger, A. K. Ersboll, S. W. Martin, L. R. Nielsen, D. L. Pearl, D. U. Pfeiffer, J. Sanchez, M. E. Torrence, H. Vigre, C. Waldner, and M. P. Ward. 2016. Explanation and Elaboration Document for the STROBE-Vet Statement: Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology - Veterinary Extension. Zoonoses Public Health 63(8):662-698.

Sargeant, J. M., A. M. O'Connor, I. R. Dohoo, H. N. Erb, M. Cevallos, M. Egger, A. K. Ersboll, S. W. Martin, L. R. Nielsen, D. L. Pearl, D. U. Pfeiffer, J. Sanchez, M. E. Torrence, H. Vigre, C. Waldner, and M. P. Ward. 2016. Methods and processes of developing the strengthening the reporting of observational studies in epidemiology - veterinary (STROBE-Vet) statement. Prev Vet Med 134:188-196.

Further readings will be provided on the course Moodle site.

Course is graded as satisfactory/unsatisfactory. The course is considered to be satisfactorily completed and credit will be given, when student has
1) submitted the written pre-course assignments
2) attended the three-day workshop

Instruction language: English.

Päivi Rajala-Schultz and Anna-Maija Virtala.