Kaisa_2012_3_photo by Veikko Somerpuro

Enrol
13.2.2020 at 09:00 - 4.3.2020 at 23:59

Timetable

Here is the course’s teaching schedule. Check the description for possible other schedules.

DateTimeLocation
Wed 18.3.2020
10:15 - 11:45
Fri 20.3.2020
10:15 - 11:45
Wed 25.3.2020
10:15 - 11:45
Fri 27.3.2020
10:15 - 11:45
Wed 1.4.2020
10:15 - 11:45
Fri 3.4.2020
10:15 - 11:45
Fri 24.4.2020
10:15 - 11:45

Description

The course is mainly targeted for the ENS students. If there are places left, the course is also open for other Master level students, including exchange students.

The course will approach the challenges of studying Europe from a media and communication perspective. It will introduce two basic themes – the possibilities of a European public sphere, and the relevance of national media systems. With the help of theories of communication, students learn to critically analyse the roles of the media and public sphere in shaping European politics, democracy and identities both historically and in the current context of growing political contradictions and polarisation of opinions regarding European integration. This question will be looked at from a European, national and regional perspective. To balance the theoretical approach, extensive empirical examples will be used, derived from different everyday European media contexts. In addition, a third component of the course will include country/region specific case studies prepared by the students. Finally, the students will gain tools to understand European public life and be able to place different media systems and cultures in a European context. The course enables students to develop their critical thinking and writing skills as well as argumentation and presentation skills through written assignments, an oral presentation and class room discussions.

Offered every year, teaching period IV.

- The role of media as part of a political system

- Media systems in a European context

- European public sphere in theory and practice

The course will be offered in a seminar format of maximum 20 students (14 hours). Attendance in classes is compulsory. The course will be completed by attending classes, a lecture diary, an oral presentations in pairs or small groups and an essay (5 pages) based on the presentation.

The core/set readings of the course are:

Hallin, Daniel C. and Mancini, Paolo: Comparing Media Systems: Three Models of Media and Politics.

Hallin, Daniel C. and Mancini, Paolo: Comparing Media Systems Beyond the Western World

Brüggemann, Michael, Sven Engesser, Florin Büchel, Edda Humprecht, Laia Castro (2014): Hallin and Mancini Revisited: Four Empirical Types of Western Media Systems. Journal of Communication, 64 (6), pp. 1037–1065.

Herkman, Juha (2009): The Structural Transformation of The Democratic Corporatist Model: The Case of Finland. Javnost - The Public, (16)4, pp. 73-90.

Risse, Thomas (ed.) European public spheres: politics is back (Cambridge University Press, 2014)

Fraser, Nancy (2007): Transnationalizing the Public Sphere. On the Legitimacy and Efficacy of Public Opinion in a Post-Westphalian World. Theory, Culture & Society, 24(4), pp. 7-30.

The course will be based on lectures by the teachers and case presentations by the students. An emphasis is put on discussions in the class, and analyzing historical and topical cases/events. Students are also encouraged to make use of different materials for their presentations. The students are expected to participate in class discussions actively, and to prepare a lecture diary for each lecture and case presentation. Students will prepare oral presentations connected to the course themes in pairs or in small groups, and after having feedback will write a final essay together.

The grading scale of the course is 0-5.

The students will be assessed separately for each of the different requirements of the course (general class activity, oral presentation+essay and lecture diary). The students will receive feedback on their course performance throughout the course from the lecturer and will thus be able to constantly self-assess and enhance their learning. They are encouraged to ask for feedback and help throughout the course.

Language of instruction: English

The course will be offered in a seminar format of maximum 20 students (14 hours). Attendance in classes is compulsory. The course will be completed by attending classes, a lecture diary, an oral presentations in pairs or small groups and an essay (5 pages) based on the presentation.

University Lecturer Lotta Lounasmeri, Centre for European Studies

Postdoctoral Researcher Markus Ojala, Centre for European Studies