Kaisa_2012_3_photo by Veikko Somerpuro

Enrol
9.12.2019 at 09:00 - 27.2.2020 at 23:59

Timetable

Here is the course’s teaching schedule. Check the description for possible other schedules.

DateTimeLocation
Tue 14.1.2020
09:15 - 12:00
Thu 16.1.2020
09:15 - 12:00
Fri 17.1.2020
12:15 - 14:00
Tue 21.1.2020
09:15 - 12:00
Thu 23.1.2020
09:15 - 12:00
Fri 24.1.2020
12:15 - 14:00
Tue 28.1.2020
09:15 - 12:00
Thu 30.1.2020
09:15 - 12:00
Fri 31.1.2020
12:15 - 14:00
Tue 4.2.2020
09:15 - 12:00
Thu 6.2.2020
09:15 - 12:00
Fri 7.2.2020
12:15 - 14:00
Tue 11.2.2020
09:15 - 12:00
Thu 13.2.2020
09:15 - 12:00
Fri 14.2.2020
12:15 - 14:00
Tue 18.2.2020
09:15 - 12:00
Thu 20.2.2020
09:15 - 12:00
Fri 21.2.2020
12:15 - 14:00
Tue 25.2.2020
09:15 - 12:00
Thu 27.2.2020
09:15 - 12:00
Fri 28.2.2020
12:15 - 14:00

Description

Optional course in the master program

Chemistry and Molecular Science master program is responsible for the course

The course is available to students from other degree programmes

  • KEK201 Molecular structure and spectroscopy
  • KEM367 Mathematical and numerical methods in computational chemistry
  • KEM341 Quantum chemistry

Kem365 Laser spectroscopy

By completing the course, students will master the following:

i) Basics of quantum mechanics needed to understand spectroscopic observations.

ii) The fundamentals of interaction of light and matter.

iii) Ideas behind experimental methods and spectrometers/equipment.

iv) Different forms of rotational spectroscopy which are used to obtain very precise information of molecular structures.

v) Vibrational spectra are interpreted using two somewhat different ideas: global and local nuclear motions to identify molecular species.

vi) Electronic spectroscopy is used to follow chemical reactions.

vii) Laser experiments revolutionize molecular spectroscopy by producing huge sensitivity.

First or second year of the master program

II or III period every second year, starting 2017-18 in period III

Recapitulate basics of quantum mechanics. Absorption and emission. Spectral line characteristics. Experimental methods. Rotational infrared, millimetre wave, microwave and Raman spectroscopy: Selection rules and intensities, nuclear spin effects and determination of molecular structures. Vibrational infrared and Raman spectra: Concepts of normal and local modes, interpretation of spectra and potential energy surfaces. Electronic spectroscopy: Simple molecular orbital theories, diatomic and polyatomic molecules with selection rules and intensities including the Frank-Condon principle. Examples of sensitive laser spectroscopy experiments.

J. M. Hollas, Modern Spectroscopy, fourth edition, Wiley

Ex tempore problem solving classes and homework.

Two exams and additional points for individual activities in problem solving classes, and laboratory experiments. The standard scale 0-5.

Lectures, problem solving classes and possibly a spectroscopic laboratory experiment

No attendance requirement

Two written exams