Kaisa_2012_3_photo by Veikko Somerpuro

Enrol
20.5.2019 at 00:01 - 31.7.2019 at 23:59

Timetable

Here is the course’s teaching schedule. Check the description for possible other schedules.

DateTimeLocation
Mon 12.8.2019
09:00 - 17:00
Tue 13.8.2019
09:00 - 17:00
Wed 14.8.2019
09:00 - 17:00
Thu 15.8.2019
09:00 - 17:00
Fri 16.8.2019
09:00 - 15:00

Material

Description

• Compulsory/optional course: optional
• The Doctoral Programme in Clinical research coordinates the course
• The course is part of the Field-Specific Studies module
• The course is available to students of other degree programmes
• The course is meant primarily for graduate students and post-docs interested and/or working in human genetics, but applies also to evolutionary and experimental genetics of wild or model species as well. More senior scientists are welcome, however, in the case there are too many applicants, the priority will be given to below-PI level people.

The course is meant primarily for graduate students and post-docs interested and/or working in human genetics, but applies also to evolutionary and experimental genetics of wild or model species as well

Through this course, students will be stimulated to develop critical thinking and logical reasoning skills to try and learn from what existing results tell us about the architecture of disease - and, importantly, to question the assumptions underlying their experimental approaches, so as to develop better study designs based on better hypotheses for future studies. The reason studies are not finding the clear causal effects that are often promised is usually because the question was poorly posed or incompletely thought out, not because of technical or analytical errors. In fact, many of the most important recent findings, often of many genes (and environmental factors) with little individual effect, have been a major success, because they have shown that the causal landscape is more complex than had been widely hoped and expected, but this is in fact consistent with biological and evolutionary theory.

Autumn term

The course is designed to examine the conceptual, empirical, and theoretical approaches to understanding the complex cause and effect relationships underlying human variation. In this course we will review the logical basics of evolutionary biology, genetic epidemiology, genes' association with traits and diseases. Logical thinking helps integrate these disciplines to address questions of causality in human genetics.

Pass/fail, full attendance required, the five-day course = 3 ECTS

A 5-full day course