Anna-Liisa Heusala, 2017

norms and ethics

This course introduces the students to key changes in the Russian government system during major transformation periods.

The course introduces the students to the historical developments in Russian government and the use of the liberal-democratic model as a comparative tool. In addition, the students focus on what, how and why global indicators of governance shape wider understandings of Russia and its position vis-á-vis global normative and ethical standards.

The student acquires an ability to examine how Russian government has developed vis-à-vis the liberal-democratic model, and an understanding of global indicators of governance, specifically focusing on good governance, the rule of law and corruption indicators, and Russia’s position in these global indicators. The student gains an understanding of how the global indicators of governance are produced, disseminated and contested and their implications for understanding societal transformation and modernization processes in Russia. The student gains skills and knowledge to situate and analyse Russia´s governance trajectories in a global context.

Enrol
13.8.2019 at 09:00 - 2.9.2019 at 23:59

Timetable

Russian transitions and the liberal-democratic model (Anna-Liisa Heusala), 2.9.2019, 10:15-11:45
Imperial Russian government (Anna-Liisa Heusala), 5.9.2019, 10:15-11:45
Soviet model of government (Anna-Liisa Heusala), 9.9.2019, 10:15-11:45
Post-Soviet Russian government (Anna-liisa Heusala), 12.9.2019, 10:15-11:45
Global indicators of governance and Russia (Rustam Urinboyev), 16.9.2019, 10:15-11.45
Seminar, presentation of individual works (Anna-Liisa Heusala), 19.9.2019, 9:15-11:45
Exam in the class, based on course literature, 23.9.2019, 10:15-11:45

DateTimeLocation
Mon 2.9.2019
10:15 - 11:45
Thu 5.9.2019
10:15 - 11:45
Mon 9.9.2019
10:15 - 11:45
Thu 12.9.2019
10:15 - 11:45
Mon 16.9.2019
10:15 - 11:45
Thu 19.9.2019
09:15 - 11:45
Mon 23.9.2019
10:15 - 11:45

Material

Course readings:

https://www.constituteproject.org/constitution/Russia_2008.pdf

http://www.worldbank.org/en/publication/wdr2017, pages 1-37 and 83-101

Brovkin, Vladimir N. (2003), Corruption in the 20th Century Russia, Crime, Law & Social Change 40: 195–230.

Heusala, Anna-Liisa (2013), Changes of Administrative Accountability in Russian Transitions, Review of Central and East European Law 38 (3-4): 267-293.

Kahn, Jeffrey (2006), The Search for the Rule of Law in Russia, 37 Georgetown Journal of International Law 37(2): 353-409.

Küpper, Herbert (2013), The Concept of Multilayered Statehood in the System of Russian Federalism, Review of Central and East European Law 38: 239-266.

Additional readings:

Carrère d´Encausse, Hélène (1980), Confiscated Power: How Soviet Russia Really Works. Harper Row.

Pomeranz, William E. (2019), Law and the Russian State: Russia´s Legal Evolution from Peter the Great to Vladimir Putin. Bloomsbury Academic.

Rowney, Don Karl and Huskey, Eugene (eds.) (2009), Russian Bureaucracy and the State: Officialdom from Alexander III to Vladimir Putin. Palgrave Macmillan.

Conduct of the course

Learning goals:

The student acquires an ability to examine how the Russian government has developed in major historical transformations in relation to the liberal-democratic model of government. The student gains an understanding of current global indicators of governance, specifically focusing on good governance, the rule of law and corruption indicators, and Russia’s position in these global indicators. The student learns how the global indicators of governance are produced, disseminated and contested and what are the implications for understanding societal transformation and modernization processes in Russia. The student gains skills and knowledge to situate and analyse Russia´s governance trajectories in a global context.

Teaching materials:

Materials and the list of required literature will be provided in MOODLE course page.

Activities:

The course will be based on lectures and assignments.

Assessment:

The assessment of the course is based on participation, producing essay(s) and in-class exam. The grading of the course is 0-5.

Description

Compulsory for students in Master´s programme in Russian Studies. Optional for all students of University of Helsinki including exchange students.

Orientation to Russian Studies and Methods and Theories for students in Russian Studies Master´s programme.

Student identifies normative and ethical questions that are connected to global challenges. Student is able to relate different disciplinary based approaches to the topic. Student understands multi-/interdisciplinary approach in practice and is able to recognize different disciplinary approaches in the analysis norms and ethics in the context of Russia.

First year/period I or II.

This course takes a normative and ethical perspective asking “why?” questions, i.e. why global challenges of resilience and sustainability are imperative for all nations, including Russia.

List of required literature can be given in advance. Literature and other materials can be delivered in the course.

The course will be based on lectures and/or group work. The group work can be organised on the basis of problem-based learning.

The assessment of the course is based on participation and/or producing essay(s) and/or learning diary and/or group works. The grading of the course is 0-5.

Contact teaching. Compulsory attendance during the entire course.