Kaisa_2012_3_photo by Veikko Somerpuro

Enrol
3.10.2019 at 09:00 - 31.10.2019 at 23:59

Timetable

Here is the course’s teaching schedule. Check the description for possible other schedules.

DateTimeLocation
Thu 31.10.2019
10:15 - 13:45
Thu 7.11.2019
10:15 - 13:45
Thu 14.11.2019
10:15 - 13:45
Thu 21.11.2019
10:15 - 13:45
Thu 28.11.2019
10:15 - 13:45
Thu 5.12.2019
10:15 - 13:45

Description

Depending on the available student places, the course is open to students of other programmes as part of the optional studies in the study module for interaction research. No more than 50 participants

The student will understand the nature of the concept of agency and the variation in social psychological theorisation about it. The student will also understand the core ideas regarding agency in Meadian views on interaction and dialogical reflective thinking; Goffman’s dramaturgical, frame-analytical and game-theoretical perspectives on agency in interaction; and the micro social-constructionist approaches within discursive and rhetorical social psychology. The student will know how to problematise questions of agency from relational perspectives.

Second period during the autumn term of the first year of studies

The course gives an overview on the concept of agency and theories in relational strands of social psychology. Included are Meadian views on interaction and dialogical reflective thinking; Goffman’s dramaturgical, frame-analytical and game-theoretical perspectives on agency in interaction; and micro social-constructionist approaches to agency within discursive and rhetorical social psychology. To provide a uniting thematic framework and problematisation for the course, special attention will be given to the agent–principal relation, or service for someone, as a question of agency in the light of relational theorising.

Related literature will be announced during the course.

Graded on a scale of 0 to 5 (0 = Fail, 1 = Passable, 2 = Satisfactory, 3 = Good, 4 = Very Good, 5 = Excellent)

The course consists of regular readings (texts to be read before each class); lectures; small group discussions in which readings, lectures and illustrative empirical cases are processed; and a concluding essay (10 pages), which utilises optional readings or empirical exercises.