Kaisa_2012_3_photo by Veikko Somerpuro

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Description

The lecture course is obligatory for the students in the Study Direction of Development Studies. Possible restrictions of participation will be announced in the annual study programme.

This course examines social realities in developing countries by seeking to understand diverse aspects of the daily reality as lived experience of people in various parts of the Global South. The course focuses on economic, socio-cultural and political dimensions of social reality through the core concepts of inequality, political subjectivity, and postcoloniality.

Term: 2

Through lectures and jointly read and discussed journal articles and a fiction book, the course takes a micro-perspective to the world’s perspectives and everyday life of the studied people, and seeks to identify their links with wider political-economic processes. Proposed themes my relate to broader themes such as: livelihoods (including access to land, un/employment, industrial work, child labor etc.); society and cultures (e.g. cosmology, religion and politics, intersectionality and cosmopolitanism, language and education); environment and place making (e.g. space, place, nature, resource use, rights and exploitation); states, power, and citizenship (e.g. state power, bureaucracy and the culture of the State, political subjectivity, citizenship and access to services in the city). Themes are examined by linking recent research in Anthropology, Development Studies, Education, Gender Studies, Political Ecology and Human Geography with a book of fiction about social realities by a well-known postcolonial author.

Reading material for lecturing and blended learning:
Scientific journal articles, videos and movies, as well as the following books:
- Fiction book: e.g. Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Half of a Yellow Sun
- Murray Li, Tania. 2014. Introduction. In Land’s End. Capitalist Relations on an Indigenous Frontier. Durham: Duke University Press.
- Ferguson, James. 2014. Give a Man a Fish: Reflections on the New Politics of Distribution. Durham: Duke University Press.
- Tuttle, Carolyn. 2012. Mexican Women in American Factories: Free Trade and Exploitation on the Border. Austin: University of Texas Press.

- Marisol de la Cadena. 2015. Earth Beings: Ecologies of Practice across Andean Worlds. Durham: Duke University Press.
- Auyero Javier and Débora Alejandra Swistun. 2009. Flammable: Environmental Suffering in an Argentine Shantytown. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Obligatory literature for literature exam:
• Murray Li, Tania. 2014. In Land’s End. Capitalist Relations on an Indigenous Frontier. Durham: Duke University Press.
• Ferguson, James. 2014. Give a Man a Fish: Reflections on the New Politics of Distribution. Durham: Duke University Press.
• Marisol de la Cadena. 2015. Earth Beings: Ecologies of Practice across Andean Worlds. Durham: Duke University Press.
• Auyero Javier and Débora Alejandra Swistun. 2009. Flammable: Environmental Suffering in an Argentine Shantytown. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

In the evaluation the different assignments will be considered, self-evaluation will be recommended.

a) Seminars and groupworks or e-learning and involved literature and assignments (Bachelor Students in Society and Change Programme)
b) Literature exam

Annual forms of implementation will be clarified in the study programme.