Kaisa_2012_3_photo by Veikko Somerpuro

Crisis, conflicts and revolutions as complex emerg

This course will introduce students to different theories and perspectives that shape our understanding of pivotal events in history. It will teach students to distinguish between the structures, the event, its process, its impact and legacy on individuals, communities and societies. It will invite students to consider the entanglement of biased narration that construct and give meaning to events. Individual cases such as the Great Irish Famine 1845-52, the Finnish Famine in the 1860s and twentieth century conflicts will be explored in closer detail from the perspectives provided by “complex emergencies” and “New Famine -studies”.
The learning outcome is that students are capable of critically categorising and examining the background, the process, actors, aftermath, and the possible functions of any crisis, conflict or revolution.
14 sessions will be divided between five/six lectures by the teacher, seven/six reading circle -sessions, and one or two sessions devoted for a) a documentary film and/or b) an excursions to explore the impacts of periods of crisis in Helsinki cityscape. Students will be given the task to present and discuss one book from the reading list, to give a thorough presentation of it and lead an in-depth discussion in the group. Other students will make a peer evaluation on the delivery of the book presentation and the content of the book itself. This will provide everyone taking the course with a solid understanding of the relevant literature in case they want to further explore similar issues. Students will submit weekly assessments papers on their learning during the course. Students will write a short essay exploring a crisis from the perspective of one person, in which they should utilise literature suggested to them in the reading list.

Enrol
15.8.2019 at 09:00 - 4.9.2019 at 23:59
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Timetable

Here is the course’s teaching schedule. Check the description for possible other schedules.

DateTimeLocation
Wed 4.9.2019
10:15 - 11:45
Fri 6.9.2019
12:15 - 13:45
Wed 11.9.2019
10:15 - 11:45
Fri 13.9.2019
12:15 - 13:45
Wed 18.9.2019
10:15 - 11:45
Fri 20.9.2019
12:15 - 13:45
Wed 25.9.2019
10:15 - 11:45
Fri 27.9.2019
12:15 - 13:45
Wed 2.10.2019
10:15 - 11:45
Fri 4.10.2019
12:15 - 13:45
Wed 9.10.2019
10:15 - 11:45
Fri 11.10.2019
12:15 - 13:45
Wed 16.10.2019
10:15 - 11:45
Fri 18.10.2019
12:15 - 13:45

Description

Master and exchange students

This course will introduce students with different theories and perspectives that shape our understanding of pivotal events in history. It will teach students to distinguish between the structures, the event, its process, its impact and legacy on individuals, communities and societies. It will invite students to consider the entanglement of biased narration that construct and give meaning to events.

The learning outcome is that students are capable of critically categorising and examining the background, the process, actors, aftermath, and the possible functions of any crisis, conflict or revolution.

4.9.-18.10.2019

Wed 10-12, Topelia B114, Unioninkatu 38

Fri 12-14, Metsätalo, Sali 24, Unioninkatu 40

Individual cases such as the Great Irish Famine 1845-52, the Finnish Famine in the 1860s and twentieth century conflicts will be explored in closer detail from the perspectives provided by “complex emergencies” and “New Famine -studies”.

14 sessions will be divided between five/six lectures by the teacher, seven/six reading circle -sessions, and one or two sessions devoted for a) a documentary film and/or b) an excursions to explore the impacts of periods of crisis in Helsinki cityscape. Students will be given the task to present and discuss one book from the reading list, to give a thorough presentation of it and lead an in-depth discussion in the group. Other students will make a peer evaluation on the delivery of the book presentation and the content of the book itself. This will provide everyone taking the course with a solid understanding of the relevant literature in case they want to further explore similar issues. Students will submit weekly assessments papers on their learning during the course. Students will write a short essay exploring a crisis from the perspective of one person, in which they should utilise literature suggested to them in the reading list.

David Arnold, Famine: Social Crisis and Historical Change (Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1988)

David Keen, Complex Emergencies (Cambridge: Polity Press, 2008)

Guido Alfani and Cormac Ó Gráda (eds.), Famine in European History (Cambridge University Press, 2017)

Cormac Ó Gráda, Famine: a short history (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2009)

Donald Bloxham and Robert Gerwarth (ed.), Political Violence in twentieth-century Europe (Cambridge University Press, 2011)

John Schwarzmantel, Democracy and Political Violence (Edinburgh University Press, 2011).

Stephen Devereux (ed.), New Famines: Why famines persist in an era of globalization (London: Routledge 2007)

George Lakoff, Moral Politics: How Liberals and Conservatives Think (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2002)

Michael Mann, The Darkside of Democracy: Explaining Ethnic Cleansing (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005)

Peter Gray and Kendrick Oliver (eds.), The Memory of Catastrophe (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2005)

Johan Galtung, Peace by Peaceful Means: Peace and Conflict, Development and Civilization (Oslo: PRIO, 1996)

Marek Tamm (ed.), Afterlife of Events: Perspectives on Mnemohistory (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015)

Gérard Chaliand, A global history of war: from Assyria to the twenty-first century (Oakland: University of California Press, 2014)

Thierry Balzacq (ed.), Securitization Theory (London: Routledge, 2010)

David P. Nally, Human Encumbrances: Political Violence and the Great Irish Famine (Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame, 2011)

Jay Winter, Remembering War: The Great War Between Memory and History in the Twentieth Century (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2006)

Dominic LaCapra, Writing History, Writing Trauma (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2001)

James DeFronzo, Revolutions and Revolutionary Movements (Boulder: Westview Press, 2015)

Alex De Waal, Mass Starvation: the history and future of famine (Cambridge: Polity Press, 2018)

Alex De Waal, Famine that Kills: Darfur, Sudan (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005)

Jenny Edkins, Whose Hunger? Concepts of Famine, Practices of Aid (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press 2000)

Jeremy Black, Insurgency and counterinsurgency: a global history (Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield, 2016)

Weekly assesment papers 40%

Book presentation 25%

Essay 25%

Activity during discussions in class 10%

14 sessions will be divided between five/six lectures by the teacher, seven/six reading circle -sessions, and one or two sessions devoted for a) a documentary film and/or b) an excursions to explore the impacts of periods of crisis in Helsinki cityscape. Students will be given the task to present and discuss one book from the reading list, to give a thorough presentation of it and lead an in-depth discussion in the group. Other students will make a peer evaluation on the delivery of the book presentation and the content of the book itself. This will provide everyone taking the course with a solid understanding of the relevant literature in case they want to further explore similar issues. Students will submit weekly assessments papers on their learning during the course. Students will write a short essay exploring a crisis from the perspective of one person, in which they should utilise literature suggested to them in the reading list.

Teacher Henrik Forsberg