Kaisa_2012_3_photo by Veikko Somerpuro

Enrol
12.12.2019 at 09:00 - 3.2.2020 at 23:59

Timetable

Here is the course’s teaching schedule. Check the description for possible other schedules.

DateTimeLocation
Mon 3.2.2020
16:15 - 19:45
Tue 4.2.2020
16:15 - 19:45
Mon 10.2.2020
16:15 - 19:45
Tue 11.2.2020
16:15 - 19:45
Mon 24.2.2020
16:15 - 19:45
Tue 25.2.2020
16:15 - 19:45

Description

Development Economics I

On completion of the unit students will be able to:

  • Understand and apply extended theories and principles of economic development and have received extensive applied examples of these from developing countries.
  • Understand the linkage between theory and practice.
  • Develop analytical skills relevant to the assessment of these different economic development principles.
  • Able to examine the main sources of economic and social data relevant to economic development – particularly in relation to education, health, gender and social protection issues.;
  • Understand the knowledge and skills acquired to the study of the main forces sustaining and limiting economic development today, and the design of effective policy interventions.

The course aims to build on the course ‘Development Economics I’, by extending the focus of understanding development economics by providing a series of extended topic based lectures that are key to current policy debates in development economics.

The lectures will provide a theoretical understanding of the issues covered in addition to providing extensive applied examples of the areas covered – including issues of education, health, gender, finance and social protection.

  • Lawson, David with D. Hulme, I. Matin and K. Moore (2010), What Works for The Poorest: Poverty Reduction Programmes for the Ultra Poor, Practical Action.
  • Todaro, M. P. and Smith, S. (2006), Economic Development 9 th ed. Pearson, London (recommended for all)
  • Meir G and Rauch JE (eds) (2005), Leading Issues in Economic Development 8 th edition Oxford UP (recommended for all)

On a scale from 0 to 5

The lecture course will be complemented with group work exercises and assessed with a written assignment (3000 word essay).